Feeling Culinary: What to Pair with Duck Pond’s Pinot Gris?

The Back Story:

The goal for this particular day was to create a dish that would adequately pair with a gift wine. Like the Desert Wind Viognier I reviewed a couple months ago, I received the 2008 Duck Pond Cellars Pinot Gris as a gift from the Fries family as a way for me to taste the wines they were pouring at the 2010 Wine Bloggers Conference.

Before I reveal the recipe, however, let’s get an idea of what we’re working with here.

(Yes, I had to sneak a little football into the picture. It’s the time of the season.)

The Results:

The appearance of the wine is a very pale straw color with a very slight green tint. The viscosity is low, but the depth and clarity is rather impressive.

The nose of the wine is very bright, with honey, honeydew melon, and pear all standing out stark and sweet.

The texture of the wine is a bit thin, with a light body, but it has a crisp and pleasant texture to it.

The flavor of the wine is very subtle at the outset. It gradually encroaches upon the entirety of your tongue, building to a rich, full finish. The alcohol is just a bit prominent, but other than that, the balance is great. Citrus and orchard fruits contribute to the flavor, with a bit of honey for complexity. The finish is a pure, bright melon.

For the Casual Drinker:

This is a wonderfully light, crisp, and flavorful wine that, unfortunately, would probably fail to impress the palates geared towards bigger reds. Light fruits, light flavors, light body, just a hint of sweetness, this is definitely a warmer-weather kind of wine that would do just fine on its own. It doesn’t need food to shine, though, as you’ll see below, the right food certainly will make it a fantastic experience.

The Conclusion:

Though I’m generally not a Pinot Gris fan, when it’s done right, it’s a very clean and agreeable experience. This Pinot Gris is done right, and it’s a true value buy at $12.00. 7/10

The Recipe:

I took several chicken tenderloins and lightly breaded them in a blend of white flour, salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, paprika, oregano, celery seed, and thyme. I then pan-fried them in oil, resulting in a golden-brown coating that infuses the spices with the meat itself:

After that, I tossed them in a ketchup-based sauce that was seasoned to my taste… here’s the basics for enough to coat a half a pound of tenderloins (about 6 strips), with some leeway as to your personal taste:

You’re going to need finely chopped vidalia onions and peppers. Which peppers you use really depends on the heat you’re looking for, though I recommend staying away from anything hotter than a habanero pepper. For the flavors to match, ideally you’d go with a combination of Poblano, Mulato, or Anaheim peppers. It’s hard to get those outside of a gourmet produce shop, though, so work with what you know. Chilis and Jalapenos are pretty easy to get. You could even go bell if you want no heat at all. For this recipe, you’ll need about two tablespoons of chopped onion and two tablespoons of chopped peppers per half cup of sauce.

If the onions and peppers are fresh, sauté them (but don’t brown them) for a few minutes to soften them. If they’re marinated or have spent some time soaking in water, they’re good to go.

In a simmering small saucepan, blend a half a cup of ketchup with a tablespoon of either raw sugar (for a lighter sauce) or brown sugar (for a thicker sauce). Add splashes of vinegar and soy sauce. Add the onions and peppers. For seasonings, you want to keep it light so it won’t interfere with the onions and peppers (we’re not going with garlic for this sauce). I suggest just a bit of paprika for heat, a bit of ginger for depth, and cilantro to garnish the flavor, but let your taste buds and your sense of smell be your guide. Let it simmer for a good 20 minutes or so, long enough for the peppers and onions to start to melt into the sauce and release their flavors.

I served it (to myself) with some stove-cooked black-eye peas. The sauce, as I prepared it mildly, matched the Pinot Gris very well, accentuating the bold fruit flavors without overwhelming them. A spicier sauce would need a fuller white, either in body or in sweetness.

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