Breaking out the Big Guns for a Rich, Ripe Rioja

Last week’s wine tasting was a special treat, as Greg broke out one of the cellaring bottles we have in the office. A Rioja bottled around the time of Y2K made an appearance, the cork popping just at the peak of its aging. Because we tend to go for the drink-now wines available at local shops, this was a great way to end the week.

1999 Pujanza RiojaThe 1999 Bodegas Pujanza Rioja is a classic Tempranillo blend from the city of Laguardia, Rioja, in Spain. It sports a deep cherry color with significant tanning at the ages, indicative of its decade spent in the bottle. There is a considerable amount of sediment in the wine, clouding the wine from its initial pour. If we’d had the time, we would have decanted this bottle in a decanter that featured a punt or using a funnel with a filter; as it was, we had to wait for the sediment to settle in our glasses, which also gave us time to let the wine breathe.

The nose of the wine featured a very rich and advanced bouquet, with notes of stewed prunes and olives buoyed by a smokey and spicy aroma. The overall impression was of a baked, savory dish, something classic with Mediterranean flair. The flavors matched, with a subtle minerality holding firm behind the prunes until a medium woody finish. An herbal savoriness also makes an appearance, most strongly reminding me of fresh-cut basil. It was medium-bodied, subtly, silkily textured, with a beautiful balance that offered very fine, powdery tannins. This wine was just on the edge of tired, so I’m glad we opened it up when we did. It’s certainly not a cheap wine, selling for around $60 to $65, but as a harmonious and rich experience, it’ll be well worth it if you manage to find a bottle of this extremely rare treat.

We had the opportunity to give two accessories a try this week: the Stiletto Cork Extractor and an in-bottle decanter. The Stiletto is a ridiculously heavy-duty opener requiring even less “elbow grease” than even the higher quality rabbits on the market. A customer of mine, when she called, told me how much she loved it, as her arthritis made it difficult to use traditional corkscrews and rabbits. The cylindrical style grips the bottle for you, and the intricate gear system helps take a lot of the effort out of the lever movement. We got a clean pull that was surprisingly both swift and gentle, with no crumbling or splitting on a 10 year old cork.

Oenophilia Stiletto Cork Extractor

The other accessory, the in-bottle decanter, is an awesome piece that’s as aesthetically pleasing as it is functional. The most well-known (and arguably most respected) model is the Soiree Decanter. Though the implementation is scary, turning the bottle completely upside down, it’s entirely worth it to get the cascading effect. The wine pours down the edges of the decanter, gently agitating and mixing with the air around it before it comes back together to pour neatly from the spout. It gets the job done, as bloggers will affirm.

In Bottle Decanter Model

Have you tried the Soiree or the Stiletto? What did you think? Are they worth a purchase, or are they more gimmicky replacements for traditional accessories?

Check Norcal Wingman, 1WineDude, and TypeAMom for the linked reviews and more!

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