How NASCAR Drivers Do Cabernet Franc

The Back Story:

I’m going to say this straight: I am not a NASCAR fan. I’ve grown up in NASCAR country, lived near a speedway of one kind or another most of my life, and it’s just never rubbed off on me. A former NASCAR driver worked on my car once in Alabama.

He had a trophy up from Watkins Glen in his auto shop. I couldn’t tell you in which state he won that.

Checkered flag imageChildress Vineyards was founded by former NASCAR driver Richard Childress. His career in racing took him near the major wine-producing regions of the country, coast to coast. He developed a passion for wine as he traveled, and when his career came to a close, he researched the wine-growing conditions in the area and decided to pursue this new passion in the North Carolina piedmont.

Some of his wines have a checkered flag pattern on the label. I didn’t know why until today. I just thought it was a cool stylistic thing, like a tablecloth pattern to designate a table wine. I’m kind of dense like that sometimes.

I want to point out that I knew none of this history until I checked out the Childress Vineyards website. The only Childress I ever knew before today was my second-grade teacher. And that coach for the Vikings. That dude’s alright.

So what’s the deal with this wine? It’s made from grapes grown in North Carolina’s own Yadkin Valley and pressed and bottled on site. It contains 77% Cabernet Franc and 23% Syrah, and it spent 15 months in French oak. Thanks for springing for the French, Mr. Childress.

The Results:

Childress Cabernet FrancThe appearance of the wine is a fairly deep ruby color. The swirl suggests a fairly light viscosity and a smooth texture. It has a very beautiful, very rich depth.

The nose of the wine is just as inviting. It’s very aromatic with black cherry, cloves, and chocolate all coming forward. It has a hint of red apple, and there’s a cool alcohol scent, but it doesn’t overwhelm or otherwise negatively impact the nose.

The mouth feel of the wine is very soft, with a milky, silky texture and a medium body.

The flavor of the wine is simply a delight. There’s a dark cherry attack, with flavors of coffee and chocolate on the mid-palate accompanied by very soft tannins. I’m getting a red-fruit finish, like ripe strawberry, with a slightly bitter acidity and a subtle earthiness. As I was tasting this wine on Twitter while I wrote this review, one of my fellow Raleigh dwellers, @SeanNally, responded that it sounded like German Black Forest cake. I’ll be damned if it doesn’t! Those macerated cherries with the sour notes amplified by a sweet syrup, with milk chocolate shavings and a rich mocha cake? That’s the flavor profile for this wine. The balance is phenomenal with a relatively low acidity (3.59 pH) and alcohol at 13.3%.

For the Casual Drinker:

This is a very approachable red wine. The tannins are soft, the acidity very much in check, the flavors both straight-forward and bright. It’s a very luxurious and understated red wine, not chewy, aggressive, or overwhelming. Most people, I think, would be right at home with the chocolate-y, red-fruit characteristics. Because its flavor is a bit delicate, pairing it is trickier. Keep away from red meat, anything overly spicy or salty, anything you would describe as piquant. Pork, marinated chicken, cheese dishes seem to be the key here.

The Conclusion:

For my second big foray into North Carolina wine, this was more than I expected. In addition, 5 years was the perfect age for this wine. I would recommend this wine to anybody as an example of what North Carolina wine is capable of. For roughly $20, this wine delivers splendid value. 7/10

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