Feeling Culinary: What to Pair with Duck Pond’s Pinot Gris?

The Back Story:

The goal for this particular day was to create a dish that would adequately pair with a gift wine. Like the Desert Wind Viognier I reviewed a couple months ago, I received the 2008 Duck Pond Cellars Pinot Gris as a gift from the Fries family as a way for me to taste the wines they were pouring at the 2010 Wine Bloggers Conference.

Before I reveal the recipe, however, let’s get an idea of what we’re working with here.

(Yes, I had to sneak a little football into the picture. It’s the time of the season.)

The Results:

The appearance of the wine is a very pale straw color with a very slight green tint. The viscosity is low, but the depth and clarity is rather impressive.

The nose of the wine is very bright, with honey, honeydew melon, and pear all standing out stark and sweet.

The texture of the wine is a bit thin, with a light body, but it has a crisp and pleasant texture to it.

The flavor of the wine is very subtle at the outset. It gradually encroaches upon the entirety of your tongue, building to a rich, full finish. The alcohol is just a bit prominent, but other than that, the balance is great. Citrus and orchard fruits contribute to the flavor, with a bit of honey for complexity. The finish is a pure, bright melon.

For the Casual Drinker:

This is a wonderfully light, crisp, and flavorful wine that, unfortunately, would probably fail to impress the palates geared towards bigger reds. Light fruits, light flavors, light body, just a hint of sweetness, this is definitely a warmer-weather kind of wine that would do just fine on its own. It doesn’t need food to shine, though, as you’ll see below, the right food certainly will make it a fantastic experience.

The Conclusion:

Though I’m generally not a Pinot Gris fan, when it’s done right, it’s a very clean and agreeable experience. This Pinot Gris is done right, and it’s a true value buy at $12.00. 7/10

The Recipe:

I took several chicken tenderloins and lightly breaded them in a blend of white flour, salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, paprika, oregano, celery seed, and thyme. I then pan-fried them in oil, resulting in a golden-brown coating that infuses the spices with the meat itself:

After that, I tossed them in a ketchup-based sauce that was seasoned to my taste… here’s the basics for enough to coat a half a pound of tenderloins (about 6 strips), with some leeway as to your personal taste:

You’re going to need finely chopped vidalia onions and peppers. Which peppers you use really depends on the heat you’re looking for, though I recommend staying away from anything hotter than a habanero pepper. For the flavors to match, ideally you’d go with a combination of Poblano, Mulato, or Anaheim peppers. It’s hard to get those outside of a gourmet produce shop, though, so work with what you know. Chilis and Jalapenos are pretty easy to get. You could even go bell if you want no heat at all. For this recipe, you’ll need about two tablespoons of chopped onion and two tablespoons of chopped peppers per half cup of sauce.

If the onions and peppers are fresh, sauté them (but don’t brown them) for a few minutes to soften them. If they’re marinated or have spent some time soaking in water, they’re good to go.

In a simmering small saucepan, blend a half a cup of ketchup with a tablespoon of either raw sugar (for a lighter sauce) or brown sugar (for a thicker sauce). Add splashes of vinegar and soy sauce. Add the onions and peppers. For seasonings, you want to keep it light so it won’t interfere with the onions and peppers (we’re not going with garlic for this sauce). I suggest just a bit of paprika for heat, a bit of ginger for depth, and cilantro to garnish the flavor, but let your taste buds and your sense of smell be your guide. Let it simmer for a good 20 minutes or so, long enough for the peppers and onions to start to melt into the sauce and release their flavors.

I served it (to myself) with some stove-cooked black-eye peas. The sauce, as I prepared it mildly, matched the Pinot Gris very well, accentuating the bold fruit flavors without overwhelming them. A spicier sauce would need a fuller white, either in body or in sweetness.

The Search for the Best Boxed Wine: Week 10

The Back Story:

Ladies and gentlemen, the first iteration of the Search for the Best Boxed Wine has come to an end. After this boxed wine is exhausted, we will take a hiatus to allow the boxed wine market to change and develop. Once the 2009s are in full swing, we’ll revisit the experiment. Until then, I’ll continue to monitor these boxed wines, and I’ll create a full wrap-up post at the end of June. I appreciate you guys sticking through with this, giving me your attention, and not mocking me too much as I binged on mediocre juice. Hopefully we’ve at least been able to change a few minds about the economic viability of serving wine in bag-in-boxes.

I was hoping to end the first 10 weeks with a really kick-ass boxed wine, one that would put all the others to shame. We head to the unplumbed depths of the “award winning” 2009 Angel Juice Pinot Grigio in search of untold beauty wrapped in PET and cardboard.

(Disclosure, I snort-laughed when I noticed the “Outstanding Value” label on the box.)

The Results:
Angel-Juice-Pinot-Grigio
The appearance of the wine is a slightly pale straw, and it appears to have a medium viscosity.

The nose of the wine is very sweet and ripe, with tropical notes, melon, and citrus. Alcohol is detectable but not particularly hot at 12.5%.

The mouth feel of the wine is medium-bodied, a bit creamy, but it has a dead-weight kind of feel to it. Not a whole lot of activity.

The flavor of the wine is surprisingly bland. There’s a bit of honeydew melon and lime, but that’s basically it. Finish consists of, as far as I can tell, some sort of tropical fruit, possibly ripe banana. It’s difficult to tell because the balance is a bit off… you can taste the acidity on the finish. Alcohol is pretty well balanced, at least at around 50 degrees. As soon as the wine warmed up a bit, the flavor actually got a little bit more open. Apple became detectable, even prominent, and the citrus and melon flavors matched the acidity even better.

For the Casual Drinker:

It’s difficult to entirely recommend this wine. Pinot Grigio isn’t known for having an aggressive flavor, but that’s exactly what this wine needs in order to counteract the acidity and alcohol. As such, you’re getting a good, pleasant flavor, but it’s tempered by the imbalance. The acidity is definitely a heartburn risk and it’s a bit temperature sensitive, so don’t serve it too cold or the flavors will be too subdued. The flavor’s not opening up any in the glass.

The Conclusion:

At $20.00, or $5.00 per bottle, it’s certainly filling its niche as a bargain wine. It’s not inherently bad, just a bit flawed, but at that price, it’s perfectly fine. 5/10.

Current Line-Up:

Angel Juice Pinot Grigio 2009

  • Week 0 – Decent Pinot Grigio flavor, slight imbalance, opens up as it warms.

Bodegas Osbourne Seven NV

  • Week 0 – 6/10 – Red-fruit, spicy, slightly earthy. Bit imbalance in the alcohol. Very smooth and well-rounded.
  • Week 1 – 6/10 – Still a great flavor and a good balance. Still a pleasant tannic character.

Silver Birch Sauvignon Blanc 2009

  • Week 0 – 6/10 – Tropical, citrus, herbal flavors and nose. Slightly imbalanced acidity and alcohol.
  • Week 1 – 6/10 – Very similar to last week. Possibly I forgot to flesh this out last week :-). It’s still great.
  • Week 2 – 6/10 – Very good flavor, balance is maybe a little bit more off.

Double Dog Dare Chardonnay, California NV

  • Week 0 – 3/10 – Very off-putting nose, dull, listless color, rough mouth feel, apple and oak flavor, imbalanced acidity.
  • Week 1 – 2/10 – Flavor and balance have taken a dive. The chemical from the nose is noticeable on the flavor
  • Week 2 – 2/10 – Consistent from the last week. Weak flavor and nose, imbalance.
  • Week 3 – 2/10 – Still doing what it does. It’s imbalanced, chemically, but still clinging to its flavor.

Big House Red, California 2008

  • Week 0 – 7/10 – Lean, light texture, floral and red-fruit flavors, good balance, slightly hot nose, medium finish
  • Week 1 – 6/10 – Flavor has deteriorated a bit, and there’s a harshness that I possibly didn’t detect before
  • Week 2 – 5/10 – Harshness has intensified. The flavors are still good, just slowly fading.
  • Week 3 – 4/10 – Alcohol is detectable in the mouthfeel, finish, and nose. Flavor is a bit rougher.
  • Week 4 – 3/10 – Odd cigarette flavor and scent now… this wine is not lasting well at all.

Retired Line-up:

Pinot Evil Pinot Noir NV

  • Week 0 – 5/10 – Slightly imbalanced acidity, balanced alcohol, earthy nose, red fruit flavor, short finish, slight metallic undertaste.
  • Week 1 – 5/10 – Still as fresh as when it was opened. Similar earthiness, red fruits, short finish, slightly imbalanced acidity.
  • Week 2 – 5/10 – Still tasting pretty fresh. Still balanced. Flavor tastes on par with previous tastings.
  • Week 3 – 4/10 – Flavor is beginning to diminish, causing the alcohol flavor and metallic taste to come through more.
  • Week 4 – 4/10 – Holding steady from last week. Still a slightly off flavor, but it hasn’t diminished since.
  • Week 5 – 4/10 – Nose is a bit more harsh. Cherry flavor is strangely more prominent.
  • Average score: 4.5/10. Length of stay = 5 weeks. Final score is 5/10. I would completely recommend this wine as a stalwart backup for any occasion as well as a decent sipper on its on right.

Monthaven Central Coast Chardonnay 2008

  • Week 0 – 5/10 – Imbalanced (high) acidity, balanced alcohol, apple, tropical, oaky flavors and nose, medium-bodied, way too bitter finish.
  • Week 1 – 5/10 – Similar balance in acidity and alcohol, similar flavors and nose, similar bitter finish
  • Week 2 – 5/10 – Starting to taste a bit more imbalanced, flavors and nose have faded slightly, finish is less bitter
  • Week 3 – 4/10 – Odd caramel scent on the nose. Flavor has deteriorated and the balance is still off.
  • Week 4 – 3/10 – Flavor has deteriorated further. Alcohol flavor is starting to take a prominent feature.
  • Week 5 – 3/10 – Held steady for the final week. Still drinkable, and the flavor’s still partially there.
  • Average score: 4.2/10. Length of stay = 5 weeks. Final score is 5/10. Though it didn’t finish strongly, this boxed wine is good for a few weeks of very tasty drinking.

Wine Cube California Vintner’s Red Blend 2008

  • Week 0 – 3/10 – Weak structure, heavy oak nose, red-fruit profile, heavy vanilla oak flavor, light-bodied, very short finish.
  • Week 1 – 3/10 – Exactly the same as before. Somehow, and I don’t know how, this sweet vanilla red wine manages to be drinkable.
  • Week 2 – 3/10 – Nose is a little bit off, but the flavor is still the same as before.
  • Week 3 – 3/10 – Same flavor, just a bit weaker. Odd buttered popcorn scent on the nose now.
  • Week 4 – 3/10 – Alcohol is becoming prominent on the nose and flavor. Other than that, it’s holding up well
  • Week 5 – 1/10 – Became much harsher, flavor took a nose-dive. It’s about time… it’s time to retire.
  • Average score: 2.7/10. Length of stay = 5 weeks. Final score is 3/10. I really didn’t want to like this wine, but it held up extremely well after being opened. Too bad it simply wasn’t well made.

Bota Box Shiraz California 2006

  • Week 0 – 3/10 – Imbalanced (high) acidity, imbalanced (high) alcohol, smooth texture, black fruits, very hot nose
  • Week 1 – 3/10 – Imbalanced acidity and alcohol, smooth texture, no loss in flavor, hot nose, maybe a bit more bitter finish
  • Week 2 – 3/10 – Still imbalanced, same texture, flavor, and nose. Holding its meager flavor well.
  • Week 3 – 3/10 – There’s something a little off on the flavor, but it’s not enough to drop the score. Still mostly the same.
  • Week 4 – 2/10 – Tastes very soft now, like the structure is beginning to deteriorate. Weak flavor, alcohol is strangely no longer prominent in the flavor
  • Week 5 – 2/10 – The flavor profile is very different. Very soft, very meek, hardly representative of the big fruit that preceded it.
  • Average score: 2.6/10. Length of stay = 5 weeks. Final score is 3/10. Had a pretty decent stay, though it came from humble beginnings. If nothing else, you’ve got over a month to drink it.

Black Box Chardonnay Monterey 2008

  • Week 0 – 4/10 – Imbalanced (high) acidity, balanced alcohol, briny, weak texture, slightly sour, fruit-forward, weak nose
  • Week 1 – 3/10 – Lost nothing on the nose, lost some flavor, still very imbalanced acidity, similar mouth feel, texture, increased sourness
  • Week 2 – 2/10 – Nose and flavor are starting to get musty, still overly acidic, beginning to taste flat, metallic, alcohol flavor still balanced
  • Week 3 – 1/10 – Nose and flavor lost distinguishing characteristics. Taste mostly of acid and alcohol. Flavor is officially wince-inducing. Consider this guy retired.
  • Average score: 2.5/10. Length of stay = 3 weeks. Final score is 2/10. Started off all right, but deteriorated too quickly to make it a contender for the best boxed wine.

Washington Hills Merlot NV

  • Week 0 – 3/10 – Imbalanced (high) alcohol, decent acidity, red fruit, blueberry, oaky flavors and nose, short finish.
  • Week 1 – 3/10 – Still hot on the tongue, balanced acidity, flavors are all holding true. Nose hasn’t changed.
  • Week 2 – 3/10 – Nose and flavor are still the same, mediocre but not any worse.
  • Week 3 – 2/10 – A slightly unusual, chemical flavor is starting to come forward. It’s really affecting the flavor.
  • Week 4 – 0/10 – Nose consists entirely of alcohol now. Flavor is unrecognizable. This guy is retired.
  • Average score: 2.2/10. Length of stay = 4 weeks. Final score is 1/10. Started poorly, and the wine was essentially undrinkable after 3 weeks. Not a good trait in a boxed wine.
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