Music Monday: Inappropriate for a Football Tailgate

Every Monday, I’m bringing you what I sipped on over the weekend as well as what I listened to to enhance the experience.

The Music

While this album is not one that will make you run through a brick wall, it’s still recently become part of my pre-game football ritual. Perhaps because it hearkens back to my first years in college, when I really became a college football fan, maybe because deep down I’m just a huge softy, whatever the reason, The Anniversary’s “All Things Ordinary” is a great example of the gentler music I listened to when I wanted to “rock out.”

The Wine

This weekend was much more an exercise in quantity, not quality, as we had a nice gathering of friends for the Virginia Tech football game. Thus, the goal here was to furnish enough for a group of widely varying tastes with as little expense as possible.

The solution? Trader Joe’s, obviously.

While the beer-friendly crowd sipped on New Belgium’s 2° Below (and… sigh… Bud Select), a fantastic and affordable winter ale from Colorado, those who had wine on the brain opted for a Rosé. Trader Joe’s has a fair selection of Rosés, mostly in their $4 to $6 value price range, and we opted for the 2008 La Ferme Julien Rosé for $5.

La Ferme Julien bottleAccording to Wine Harlots, La Ferme Julien is “the Trader Joe’s private label of the La Vieille Ferme that gets passing marks in the major wine publications.” That’s a good sign, especially considering some of Trader Joe’s bargain wines can be traced back to faceless, mass-produced California schlock vineyards.

So what of the wine? It had a very pure light red color, with a medium viscosity. The aroma was almost candy-like in nature, with sweet citrus, strawberries, and cherries. The flavor, though very dry, tasted a bit canned, stale, citrus-forward, just a touch of yogurt and lemon, and a strawberry candy finish. The acidity might be a touch high, lending it a tangy, thin texture, but other than that it had a decent balance. It drank well over the following day, maybe tasting a bit more stale, but still holding its flavor fairly well. I wouldn’t give it more than 24 hours, though.

If you’re looking to please the pink-drinkers in the crowd without spending a lot, I’d say you’d do okay with this one. 5/10

Wine: La Ferme Julien Rosé

Vintage: 2008

Producer: La Vieille Ferme

Region: Cotes du Ventoux, Rhone, France

Varietals: Cinsault, Grenache, Syrah

Alcohol: 13%

Exploring an Utter Mystery in the Yadkin Valley

From the first moment that I saw the name of the winery, “Cellar 4201,” on the North Carolina map, I was intrigued. The name reminded me, strangely, of the vaults from Fallout, and I half-expected to come across some sort of bomb-shelteresque hole in the ground a la Vault 101:

Fallout Vault 101 Door

Instead, you’re greeted by an elegant wooden door surrounded by sub-tropical plants and set in a cottage-like tasting room that seems yanked directly from Italy’s Piedmont countryside:

Cellar 4201 Entrance

Words cannot convey how intrigued I was by this winery simply because of the name. Mysterious, entirely non-descriptive, and surrounded geographically by quirky names like Divine Llama and Rag Apple Lassie and old standbys like Shelton Vineyards and Flint Hill, Cellar 4201 provoked every curious bone I had in my body (206 I believe is the current scientific count). Looking at the pictures from their website only made me even more intrigued.

Oh, and by the way, that pour they put in the montage on the home page? That’s actually about the pour you get if you pay for a glass of wine. All their wines are only $5 by the glass, and you get to keep the glass as a souvenir every single glass you buy. They, uh, they take care of their customers.

The owner, Greg, was out straightening up the patio when we arrived; he gave us a friendly welcoming, and we started conversing. He gave us a rundown of the history of the vineyard, about how he and his wife, Donna, developed their passion for wine through traveling and decided to bring their favorite varietals from France and Italy to North Carolina. While they’ve been growing the grapes since 2003, their tasting room has only been open for a year. They took plenty of time to ensure their wines were top quality before they invited the public in. He also explained the name and the label; rather than gussy up the winery’s name, they wanted to quite simply describe what they were, a wine cellar located at 4201 Apperson Road. All their labels feature an arrowhead, an homage to Donna’s Cherokee heritage. The vibrant orange that runs through their label, their logo, and the flora on-site stems from Donna’s affinity for that color.

The expansive lawn of Cellar 4201 (yes that's a cornhole set out there)

While we talked, Greg began to pour a tasting for us. He described the intent behind each wine, each vintage, explaining why things tasted the way they did. Far from a hands-off owner, Greg planted himself firmly in the winemaking, though he defers to the knowledge of Sean McRitchie, a second-generation winemaker from McRitchie Winery and Ciderworks, whom he recruited to lead the process.

Halfway through the tasting, Greg had to leave to attend to his other business, but his tasting room partner and best friend Aaron continued the customer service. With a sleeveless shirt, tribal bicep tattoo, and a deep tan, Aaron struck me more as a rugged, outdoorsy type than a tasting room attendant, but he quickly demonstrated his passion for and knowledge of Cellar 4201’s wares as he poured the last wines. Aaron described how, after a long friendship spanning decades (“We’ve never had cross words for each other,” he proudly told us), Greg recruited him to help follow his dream and create the vineyard. They attended classes together, conducted blind tastings, and otherwise educated themselves on the varieties they planted. Now, they harvest the grapes, make the wine, and pour the wines together as a seamless duo.

Gotta stop before I write too much again. How about the wines? None are over $15, and all are absolutely fantastic. Small lots are maintained from 5 total acres of vines, and their wines are 100% estate-grown, meaning all the wine gets plenty of attention throughout the process.

Cellar 4201 is a winery after my girlfriend’s heart. She’s a big red drinker, lover of Bordeaux, and very particular about her white wines. Completely flying in the face of the typical North Carolinian palate, Cellar 4201 offers only two whites (neither of them sweet), and the rest of their wines are classic left-bank Bordeaux reds and an Italian red and off-dry Rosé, both single varietal Sangiovese.

09 Stainless Steel Chardonnay – Offers a bright nose of citrus, primarily pineapple, with a surprisingly full flavor of citrus and tropical notes and a very light perceived sweetness balanced by a superb, soft acidity. Finish is medium-long and tastes like lemons. 7/10

06 Barrel-aged Chardonnay - Spent 9 months in older French and American oak, imparting a very light oak on the nose and flavor. Tropical notes still come through on the nose, and the flavor introduces a slightly buttery characteristic as well as tropical and spices. The wine has a beautiful mouth-soaking texture, incredibly smooth and firm. 7/10

Cellar 4201 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon

Cellar 4201 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon

NV Sangiovese – A quick note about the non-vintageness of this wine, straight from Greg: in 2007, frost killed almost all of their Sangiovese, leaving them with just 100 gallons after winemaking. Rather than bottle this as is, Greg decided to barrel-age the whole lot for an additional year, 2 years total, blending it with the 2008 Sangiovese after it had aged for a year.

The result is, in my opinion, the best wine they currently offer. A deep reddish-purple color like the skin of a black cherry, offering a light pepper and smoke that gives way to a rich black cherry flavor. The oak provides an incredibly nuanced, velvety texture while hardly encroaching on the pure flavor of the grapes. The tannins are chalky and delicate, offering a surprisingly smooth red wine that was perfect for sipping out in the sun. 8/10

Also, why Sangiovese? From the about us section: “After traveling to Italy, Donna developed a passion for Sangiovese. While admitting it is difficult to grow, it is currently our signature wine.” Simple.

2006 Merlot - With a nose of brisk cherry and black pepper, the Merlot hardly exhibits the 10 months it spent in French oak. It has a great structure, perhaps a bit lighter than a typical Merlot, but the flavors and texture are simply delightful. 7/10

2006 Reserve Merlot - With their Merlot, they split the vintage, oaking one twice as long as the other. Thus, the Reserve Merlot has all the characteristics of its purer brother, but with a palpable, pleasant oak characteristic. The flavor is fuller, darker, with cherries and pepper just bursting onto the palate. The texture is fuller as well, coating the mouth very nicely. Both styles are equally delicious and affordable, so choosing a Merlot is as simple as figuring out how full you prefer your reds to be. 7/10

2006 Cabernet Sauvignon - Very smoky nose. Complex flavor of dark fruits, tobacco, and wood with a smoky finish. Beautiful full flavor and texture. 10 months in French oak softened it without masking the flavor. 7/10

2006 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon - With a fuller dark fruit flavor, light oak on the nose and palate, remnants of the smoky and woody character of its lighter brother, and a raisin quality on the finish, the 2006 Reserve Cabernet takes 20 months in French oak in stride. Great texture on this one. 7/10

2006 Sweet Native - The one concession Cellar 4201 has made to the sweet-drinking crowd, the Sweet Native is an off-dry Rosé from 100% Sangiovese with 3% sugar. The flavor is an array of citrus and red fruits, with a pleasantly crisp acidity and a decidedly non-syrupy texture. As Mr. Drink Pink, I approve. 7/10

This post accompanied by a bottle of the Cellar 4201 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon. I made it almost 4 days without opening it.

Visiting Tavel, or Living the Dream as Mr. Drink Pink

The Back Story:

Exhibit A: The Rosé I ordered (first of 2 glasses) at Chateau O'Brien in 95 degree heat

So, according to Dezel from My Vine Spot, I am Mr. Drink Pink. It’s not surprising given that, to the amusement of everyone I do wine tours with, if we’re sitting outside, I usually go for the Rosé. It’s the best of both worlds, I tell you!

Considering this, if I were planning a wine tour, where would I go? There is, of course, Champagne, the most legendary of sparkling regions, the only French region allowed to create Rosé by blending red and white grapes. Then again, I’m rather fond of continuing to have money in my bank account.

Languedoc is a recently trendy area that has found favor in the New World due to it’s producers’ willingness to eschew AOC traditions in favor of American-friendly and single-varietal wines. While there’s a ton of mass-produced schlock to wade through (Languedoc produces more wine than the entire United States), the good stuff is worth finding. Kind of like California, if you simplify it, really. Ehm… I can get California from California without crossing an ocean to get it. Let’s move on.

Nope… my friends (and frienemies), my choice for Mr. Drink Pink’s holiday getaway is none other than the Rhone region of Tavel. A Rosé-only AOC, Tavel is where my heart belongs. I just didn’t know it until now. Classic big red grapes are turned into luscious, delicate palate pleasers in this region, and the designation as a pink region means that everything about the grapes is traditionally geared towards these wines.

Because flying there would be a bit of a hassle, and because my passport is currently out of commission, I’ll do the next best thing. The solution? Popping the cork on a Château de Ségriès 2008 Tavel, n’est pas?

The Results:

The appearance of the wine is a beautiful, pure, deep red, almost like cranberry juice. It doesn’t appear to be terribly full-bodied.

The nose of the wine is overwhelmingly fruity, with a slightly cool alcohol scent. Notes of citrus, strawberries, and ripe apple round out a fantastically summery scent.

The mouth feel of the wine is very crisp, with a pleasantly high acidity. It’s a bit hefty, owing to the Syrah influence and extensive skin contact, but it’s well-balanced.

The flavor of the wine is a bit simple but still delicious. Rich apple cider dominates, with strawberries and oranges coming through on the mid-palate. The finish is fairly long with a tart apple flavor.

For the Casual Drinker:

This is going to be a bit more aggressive than your typical Rosé. That said, it’s still too dry and delicate to handle the really hefty meals. I paired it with a bacon and onion pizza, and the salt and spice managed to slightly overwhelm the flavor. Regardless, it has a delicious, well-balanced fruit flavor, which is good for sipping on its own.

The Conclusion:

This is a drink now affair, offering a consistent experience from vintage to vintage. It’s a bit rare but not terribly difficult to get a hold of, and the 09s are apparently drinking very well as well. Essentially, it’s about as good as you’re going to get for Rosé under $20, and there’s plenty of good stuff out there. 7/10

In Case You Missed It:

Wine: Tavel (Rosé)

Producer: Château de Ségriès

Region: Tavel, Rhone, France

Varietal(s): Grenache, Cinsault, Syrah

Vintage: 2008

Residual Sugar: unknown

Alcohol: 14%

pH: unknown

Price: $18

Purchased at: Chapel Hill Wine Company

Virginia Wine Tour: Chateau O’Brien

Day two of my Virginia wine tour took me to Chateau O’Brien, in western Fauquier County. Picture’s worth a thousand words, right?

Entryway to Chateau O'Brien

Entryway to Chateau O'Brien

They set the stage right… The walk up to the entrance of the tasting room is lined with planted, tended grape vines. Like Breaux Vineyards, the overall feel of the facility is that of a home, with the Cellar Collection tasting room attached to an open kitchen, the Classic Collection tasting room in a 2-tiered sitting room, and an enclosed deck designed for intimacy.

Debbie and Howard O’Brien were an absolute delight to interact with, each in a different way. Both exhibited a remarkable passion for their wines, though Debbie was much more personal and intimate in her discussion while Howard was much more authoritative and instructional as each conducted their respective tastings. Debbie deftly handled the Classic Collection, their more everyday wines, while Howard presided over the Cellar Collection, their specialties and cellar-worthy wines.

Fireplace Room at Chateau O'Brien

Fireplace Room at Chateau O'Brien

Again, before I get too long-winded about the aesthetics, let’s get into their wines.

Classic Collection

2007 Northpoint Rosé – Tastes like a sorbet, off-dry, with delightfully crisp lemon and peach flavors and strawberry candy on the finish. Color is a very light red with a peach tint at the edge. It has a very active, pleasant acidity that practically dances in the mouth. It’s relatively full-bodied with a subdued lemon drop nose. $20.00 is a very fair asking price. 8/10

(to interrupt, I purchased a bottle of the Rosé in addition to a bottle of the Late Harvest Tannat, and it barely lasted 24 hours at home. I had to pop the cork on it with a grilled meal of Caribbean-style salmon, garlic-potato-stuffed yellow bell peppers, and marinated asparagus. It was one of the best wine pairings I’d had in awhile. This wine really brought out the foodie in me. Look at that color!)

Meal pairing with the Northpoint Rosé

2008 Northpoint White – 80% Pinot Grigio, 12% Viognier, 8% Petit Manseng. Fermented in stainless steel, this wine exhibits massive citrus on the attack with a healthy acidity to match. Crisp minerality and tropical flavors also present themselves, and there’s a very distinct honey on the finish. The nose is very subtle as it exhibits these notes. A good entry into their whites at $20.00. 7/10

2006 Virginia Chardonnay – An oaky Chardonnay that manages to please. The flavors from the oak are subtle, and the wine exhibits a very light nose of toast and butter. The toasty, buttercream flavor also matches the smooth, full texture very well. 6/10

2008 Buddy’s Bistro Red – A very light reddish-purple in the glass, it exhibits a strong raspberry nose and flavor. The finish is peppery but not unpleasantly so. The flavor is overall a bit light, a bit simple, and a bit hot. For $20.00, it’s a solid 6/10.

2006 Northpoint Red – A deep red with a purplish tint at the edge, the wine exhibits a beautifully bold dark fruit nose. The flavors are all dark fruit, blackberries and dark cherries, and the long finish has a rich, ripe plum characteristic. The last three words I wrote in my tasting notes? Fantastic. Well-structured. Clean. About as good as you can get for $24.00. 8/10

2008 VA Apple Wine – Made from apples hand-picked from nearby orchards, the apple wine is very smooth and crisp, with a pure, ripe apple flavor. Not sweet like apple juice and not dry like apple cider, it has a great balance for a dessert fruit wine. A bit pricey for a fruit wine at $20.00, but it’s worth it. 7/10

Buddy, the Official Mascot of Chateau O'Brien

Buddy, the Official Mascot of Chateau O'Brien

Cellar Collection

2005 Virginia Chardonnay – Has a sweet tropical nose and flavor with notes of banana and butterscotch candy, a result of 9 months in American oak. Excellent alcohol structure against a full, beautiful flavor. A phenomenal example of the proper way to oak a Chardonnay, and a fairly inexpensive lesson in those regards at $24.00. 8/10

2006 Reserve Chardonnay – Another school of thought in oak with 14 months in French oak. A good balance of butter, toast, and vanilla. Very light and creamy, slightly nutty, with a beautiful sweet cream on a long finish. $29.00 nets you a solid white wine. 7/10

2006 Northpoint Red Cellar Collection – 41% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Petit Verdot, 14% Malbec. Round dark fruit flavors, amazing complexity on the finish, very smooth and velvety, an absolute delight at $39.00. 7/10

2006 Limited Reserve Tannat – Very dark, deep reddish-purple, with a bright, ripe blackberry nose. Flavor is huge, aggressive, with a flavor of fresh dark fruits. Very well balanced. My words? “Chalky, velvety, sublime.” As Howard said, Virginia is built for Tannat. Definitely an investment at $69, but it’s one of the best wines I’ve had in the United States, let alone Virginia. 8/10

2007 Late Harvest Tannat – Exploding with dark fruits, rich, ripe blackberry and raspberry. It’s airy, not syrupy, with 4% residual sugar and 18% alcohol. Let’s go to the winery’s website for the details:

No wine language can so eloquently express the powerful elegance of this wine. The result of superb viticulture, patience, and discipline for harvest timing and sound winemaking, this subtly sweet Tannat blatantly expresses the underestimated potential of red wine in Virginia. Natural sugar accumulation, during ripening, reaches a level beyond the capacity of a natural yeast fermentation, resulting in a wine with 18% alcohol and a slightly perceptible sweetness.

Yeah, that sounds about right. It’s $69 for a 750ml bottle and worth every penny, especially for such a rarity in the wine world. 7/10

Hey, tasting through this line-up, I was in love. They haven’t been on the map for very long either (first vintage in 2005), so their wines should only improve. Word is spreading about this winery… the tasting rooms were busy, not crowded, but busy, for the majority of the time I spent there (about 4 hours).

If you ever find yourself in the area, make sure you stop by Chateau O’Brien. They’re another great example of the potential for wine in Virginia.

The 2010 Texas – Virginia Wine Summit – Part 2: The Great Tasting

Looking for part 1 of the 2010 Texas – Virginia Wine Summit? You can find the Dawn of Cooperation here on Vinotology.

Chairman: Welcome to the second session of the 2010 Texas – Virginia Wine Summit. Our participants are Joshua Sweeney, Virginia born-and-bred and host of today’s venue, Wine(Explored), and Ben Simons, native son of Texas and the man behind Vinotology. In our first session, we laid the groundwork evidence for Virginia’s and Texas’s credentials as major wine-producing regions. Today, we will accept one wine from each state as physical evidence. Virginia, please present your wine to the chamber for review.

Chairman of the wine summit

Josh: As evidence of Virginia’s worth as a major wine-producing region, I submit for review the 2008 West Wind Farm Rosé. I have selected this wine because it showcases both the abilities of Virginia wine growers as well as the creativity inherent in Virginia wine culture. When you think of a Rosé, what wine characteristics come to mind? What would you consider to be the typical Rosé? *pause for dramatic effect*

Close behind the argument of red wine drinkers versus white wine drinkers is red AND white wine drinkers versus Rosé. Bastard child of the red wine, white wine wearing the makeup of an incorrigible trollop, a blush wine for people who can’t handle their tannins, Rosés have suffered many slights in the minds of drinkers with a wine superiority complex. In actuality, a pink wine is an art unto itself, a beautiful, shape-shifting creature that can embody the crispness and sweet nature of a white or the aggressive acidity and tannic bite of a mature red. The trick is, as with any wine, in the respect and dedication of the wine maker.

When I first tasted this wine, I had no idea what I was getting into. The color was rich but light for a Rosé, a pure pink that betrayed only the slightest hint of red. The nose was dry and pungent, fruit-forward but rather tame. I was ready for the standard pink experience. Fool me once… The thing is, Merlot grapes aren’t the standard grape for a Rosé, and if I had bothered to read the tasting notes, I would have known the wine, 100% Merlot, was allowed a little under a day’s worth of skin contact to get that deep pink color.

Putting that first sip on my tongue was like dropping a bomb of dryness on my palate. After I figured out that no, I hadn’t utterly lost my mind, I was absolutely in awe of the characteristics of that wine. So crisp, so dry, balanced so well, and with a beautiful red fruit flavor that faded to a ripe strawberry finish, I was duly impressed. Unusual innovation like that is one of the benefits of living in an “up and coming” wine region, as there are no traditions to buck or expectations to meet. An additional benefit of the lesser-known region is the lower price point on these wines. The Rosé sells directly from the winery for $14.

I’ll now yield the floor to my colleague from Texas before I encroach upon his rebuttal. Your thoughts on this wine, Mr. Simons?

West Wind Farm emblem

Ben: Josh, I have to say that I admire the courage of choosing something unconventional like a Rosé.  I admit that I was intrigued when I heard that you would be presenting this wine.  As a resident of a state that is making some interesting wines from some unusual varieties, I can appreciate the creativity shown with this wine.

I really like the color of this wine, most definitely somewhat lighter than you generally see, but an interesting pinkish hue. * sniff- Hmm, the dryness of this wine is surprisingly evident even on the nose.  I do smell a bit of red fruit, but I wouldn’t say that the nose is overly fruity.  I also wouldn’t call the nose overly friendly or inviting, but it is interesting.

*sip – Wow, very interesting flavors. Surprisingly dry, and surprisingly big on the palate. The flavors of crisp cherry and citrus stand out. This wine feels like a walking contradiction. I’m getting citrus, but not a ton of acidity. I get something that seems slightly like cherry candy, but the wine is by no means sweet. The lingering flavor of strawberries and a touch of apple finish are like a nice hug goodbye.

Chairman: Thank you, Texas. The chamber now calls on you to present your wine for review.

Ben: Mr. Chairman, as evidence for the quality of Texas as a wine region, I submit the 2006 Pheasant Ridge Pinot Noir. I selected this wine for a number of reasons, but one of the primary reasons is that Pinot Noir is a grape that most people would assume cannot be grown successfully in Texas. In fact, I have even been told by a Texas winemaker that Pinot Noir can’t be grown here. This wine shows the amazing versatility of Texas viticulture.

This wine was produced in the High Plains of Texas, in my hometown of Lubbock. The winery operates under a philosophy of minimal intervention, trying to do their best to let the grapes speak for themselves. The High Plains is probably the only place in the state where Pinot Noir could be grown, as the nights get cool enough to support these thin skinned grapes. Pinot Noir is a notoriously difficult grape to grown, and an even more difficult one to do well, but I think this winery has done an excellent job.  There were only 70 cases of this wine produced.

The color of this wine is what you want a Pinot Noir to be, not dark and inky, but a somewhat light shade of garnet red. There is no doubt that this is a true Pinot Noir. The nose has beautiful red fruit notes of strawberry and cherry, with just a touch of earthiness. When I sip on this wine, I love the acidity that leaps out, with tangy fruits like sour cherry and cranberries standing out. This wine practically screams for a pork tenderloin to pair with it, which we just happen to have to serve the Chairman and each of the panelists after the evidence presentation is complete.  One final note, this wine costs only $15, which is a remarkably low price for a Pinot Noir, especially one made from a small production winery.

I now yield to the gentleman from the state of Virginia, Mr. Sweeney…

Pheasant Ridge logo

Josh: Thank you, Ben. Like that misinformed winemaker, I had never considered that Pinot Noir could be grown in a state so far south as Texas. Consider me enlightened. It would seem that Texas, like Virginia, has an interesting array of growing areas. I had known about how Texas was well suited for Mediterranean varietals such as Tempranillo and Sangiovese, but Pinot Noir? It will be very interesting to see how this pans out.

I can see what you mean about the color of this wine. That is a very rich red, though still light enough for a quality Pinot Noir. *sniff – Those red fruits really jump out at you. The cherry smell dominates for me, but I still get that undertone of earthiness that seems to me an appropriate expression of the terroir. It’s a little bit spicy and floral, but just enough to accent the red fruit, nothing overpowering. Its aroma is powerful, too. I can smell it from across the table.

*sip – Oh my. That is an incredibly harmonious wine. Fantastic acidity, and it’s well-balanced, off-dry. A very easy drinker. Again, massive red-fruits on the palate, raspberry, cherry, and, yes, cranberry. The mouth feel is velvety with a pleasant bite. I’m even getting something a little like cinnamon and pepper on the mid-palate, which transitions nicely to a long, dry, cherry finish. I probably would not have placed this as a New World wine in a blind tasting. It’s only 15 dollars, you say? I would have pegged this wine for at least $20. Chairman?

Chairman: We will now take a recess. I would like to thank our participants, Mr. Ben Simons representing Texas and Mr. Joshua Sweeney representing Virginia. We will pass preliminary deliberations onto you, the panelists. Pass the pork tenderloin, please.

West Wind Farm: Tasting Notes

Part two of my profile on West Wind Farm. You can find part one here

As I mentioned before, the best part of my tour of West Wind Farm was the wine-tasting. Although, to be honest, if you do decide to visit a vineyard, the wine should always be the focus of the trip. If the wine is mediocre, but the tasting room is an exercise in lavishness and indulgence, the winery probably has their priorities in an unfortunate order. Luckily, flying into this winery’s offerings entirely blind, I stumbled upon a consistently well-made collection of vintages.

I’m not going to give a full review of each one as I wanted to get only the overall impression of their wines. I’m hesitant to even assign a rating to them because I could very well have a different opinion once I get more than just a sip. Consider the ratings tentative, merely an indication of a positive or negative impression.

Now, onto the wines:

West Wind Farm white wine

West Wind Farm white wine (from http://www.westwindwine.com)

2007 Galena Creek White
The Galena Creek White is 100% Vidal Blanc and fermented one-third in Minnesota oak. West Wind considers it to be their Chardonnay-alternative, which I would take to mean a relatively light, easy-drinking, agreeable white wine. At that level, I would certainly agree, though the wine itself doesn’t exactly exhibit the aromas and flavors characteristic of a New World Chardonnay. I found it to be crisp and relatively dry, with a very fruity aroma. The flavor was relatively simple, predominantly apple with just the right level of tartness. Jason mentioned a melon finish, and after he said that, I did get that, though I probably wouldn’t have been able to pin it down without that suggestion. Overall impression? Good, not a world-beater, but definitely a solid buy at $15. 6/10

2008 Pinot Gris
The Pinot Gris was the first of its kind I’d had in Virginia. As such, I didn’t really have a similar wine to compare it to as I tasted. Three things I noticed about the bouquet: it was very tropical, it was surprisingly hot, and it was lacking in floral characteristics. This isn’t necessarily a detriment; I was merely expecting a lighter-bodied, tamer wine like the California variety. It had a decent sweetness and acidity. The flavor also exhibited tropical undertones, though I first detected a distinct orange. A decent wine though, at $17, a little pricey. 5/10

2008 Riesling
Surprisingly, given my affinity for this grape, it was my least favorite of the whites. The nose was an interesting blend of floral and tropical notes and had a strong, sugary scent, combining into an aroma that smelled almost exactly like bubble gum. Given this, the flavor was drier than I expected, and was both light-bodied and simple. Pear, and lots of it. It wasn’t bad, though at $17, I would hope for a bit more. 4/10

2008 Rosé
This wine took me entirely by surprise. It was a fairly light Rosé, maybe a tinge of red, but mostly a pure, rich pink, and the nose, though noticeably dry and pungent, did not suggest how potent this Rosé would be. If I had asked before I tasted, I would have known it was 100% Merlot, with almost a full day’s worth of skin contact. The dryness was shocking to say the least. After that, though, the flavors of the wine really came together. Red fruit forward, rather full-bodied, with a strong, ripe strawberry finish. Again, unexpected, but an altogether pleasant wine, and at $14, it’s their cheapest grape offering. 8/10

West Wind Red Wine Glass

West Wind Farm red wine (from http://www.westwindwine.com)

2008 Galena Creek Red
Their only grape blend, the Galena Creek Red combines Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Chambourcin, resulting in a very fruit-forward, very dry offering. The nose suggested red-fruits, mostly raspberry and strawberry, while the flavor was an incredibly brisk, tart cherry. Very good acidity, decently balanced, and full-bodied. At $16, it’s a very good base for their red wines. 7/10

2007 Cabernet Sauvignon
After multiple attempts to detect the aromas in this wine, I could only reach one conclusion: eggnog. It was extremely pungent, spicy, with a little red-fruit, maybe a hint of vanilla, possibly cinnamon or mint, and very hot. The scent was almost jarring. The taste was much more palatable, with strong red berry flavors and a spicy finish. It wasn’t too potent, with a surprisingly low acidity and a medium body, and after the initial shock wore off, I found it pleasantly drinkable. It seems like a wine that would benefit from a few years in the bottle; it might still have been a little young. $18 is a little much, I think, but it’s a unique experience that might be worth the price for those unfamiliar with east-coast Cab Sauvs. 6/10

2006 Heritage Reserve
The flagship wine of West Wind Farm, the Heritage Reserve is the premium barrels of their 2006 Cabernet Sauvignon harvest. It spent 30 months aging in French oak, such a rarity for them that only 45 cases were ever produced. I noticed first and foremost the exquisite mouthfeel, extremely silky and fine. The aging in oak significantly toned down the jarring scent I experienced in the younger Cab Sauv, resulting in a softer, more balanced red-fruit flavor that even exhibited hints of tobacco. At $29, it’s a little pricey, generally out of my comfort range, but the scarcity and improvements over the regular Cab Sauv definitely make it worth a try. 6/10

Non-Vintage Galena Creek Blackberry
One of the two Galena Creek fruit blends, this one combines Blackberry wine with Cabernet Sauvignon. The fruits never co-mingled during fermentation, resulting in an interesting dichotomy in the bottle. The sweet, overpowering blackberry flavors meet the tannic spiciness of the wine and never quite come together, though the low residual sugar (4%) lessens the impact. For a fruit wine, though, it wasn’t half bad. It was relatively well-balanced with a very appropriate acidity. I might consider pairing it with some sort of milk-chocolate-based dessert, something light that would complement the blackberry flavor. For $13, it makes an interesting and not-too-pricey alternative for those looking for a fruitier wine experience. 5/10

Non-Vintage Galena Creek Peach
The other fruit wine, however, did not fare as well. I didn’t feel there was enough balance between the peach wine and the Vidal Blanc. The flavor was helped by the low residual sugar (again, 4%), but the flavors just didn’t pair up for me. I wouldn’t say it’s undrinkable by any means; the taste was pleasant enough. The peach flavors simply overpower the delicate balance of the grape and make it a little too sweet, a little too tart, and a little too simple. That might be your thing, and if you’re willing to pay the $13 admission fee, I’d say give it a shot. 4/10

Overall, their selection is pretty fantastic, especially considering how young the winery is. And if you’ve had the opportunity to run across a West Wind Wine, I’d love for you to share your experience with me. Let me know what you had and what you thought of it. As of yet, I haven’t met anyone else who’s had one.

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